EVOLUTION OF DESIGN STYLES & TRENDS

EVOLUTION OF DESIGN STYLES & TRENDS

TERMINOLOGY
CLASSICAL – meaning generally historic
TRANSITIONAL – a crossing over mix of classical & contemporary. That would include current colours and textures
MODERN – slick, clean lines – void of classical detail usually European
CONTEMPORARY – any design of the current trend; up to date; here and now.
TRANS CONTEMPORARY IS BETWEEN CONTEMPORARY AND TRANSITIONAL & IT IS NOW AN EXPANDING STYLE
In my career, Interior Design evolved differently in economic times & vernacular life styles. Style is generally always set with large budget clients with the top tier designers of the day setting the trend. The styles are copied and modified by the middle tier designers with adjusted budgets. Finally, the manufacturers interpret that mid tier look for the chain retailers and department stores. By the time it gets to that last tier it is generally diluted and devoid of the original concept & intent.
In North America almost all great design trends have started in California or have been influenced by it. During the 80’s it took 7-10 years to move to East Coast and another 5 to move to Toronto. Now in the 2000’s it takes 1 year to move to Atlanta & 1-3 more to the East coast and now only 3-5 to move to Toronto.
Trends usually start with a Design Icon creating & promoting their evolving style & “feel” through leading shelter magazines.
Everyone wants to make a statement on some level. In order to accomplish that, the basic ingredient has to have a “FEELING”. When you come into a room one wants it to evoke a feel such as calmness, excitement & interesting to make the eye move around with excitement. In the end it should elevated your spirit. Over time, like a good piece of art, one should discover something new periodically.
FEELING, now there’s a word one needs to dwell on, focus on and take the time to understand while experiencing anything but especially an interior in this case. In my work I have always strived to have someone walk into one of my rooms and say, “This feels great!” If they say, “OH! I like that chair” & thats it; then I feel like I have failed my objectives.
People don’t really understand what a great designers work is really worth in intrinsic value. It’s not how much they charge – it’s what emotional value they leave you with.
One has to start with the backdrop of what the room is to feel like when it is completed. If it doesn’t then fix it. A novice for example usually will take the existing interior architecture and try to hang wallpaper, over accessorize or hang large pictures to try to compensate for the bones that are missing.
In an interview on KTLA Los Angeles in 1984 – in conclusion they asked me if I had a word of advice to the viewing audience on “how to get that feeling in a room”; my response was “if the room doesn’t “feel” good while you stand in it empty, then STOP, don’t add anything to the room UNTIL IT DOES!

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